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By JW FunGuy
#2301426
I am about to change the way I do things, I have always just slid boat or boats in the back of my truck to drive the 3 hours to the coast. Now I am purchasing a slide in pop up camper for the back of my truck and to hopefully extend my fishing days via camping.
So, my question is, for all y’all that trailer your kayaks, I am looking at getting one of the Malone Microlites with the retractable tongue so I can store it in my garage. Do any of you use one of those and if so what are your thoughts? I can’t keep a full size utility trailer in my yard so that is out of the equation. Anybody seen anything else out there?
Thanks!
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2301428
My buddy Stevo has one to haul 4 boats. It's a very nice trailer
If he's hauling one boat or two, he prefers putting them above his truck

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Yakima rollers and cradles help here
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By SWFinatic
#2301434
I have a trailer but only use it when I have to. When we drive 3 hours to Rockport I put the Outback and the Viking on top of the bed of my F-150 and the gear in the bed. Even when I go fishing alone and take my heavy PA 14 I don't take the trailer. It's harder to park with it, more issues as a whole. If I didn't have Boondox in the PA I would use the trailer tho.

That said your situation is completely different than mine with the addition of a truck camper. Unless you can carry your kayak inside the camper a trailer makes the most sense.

I have seen a few guys go with a Harbor Freight trailer since they fold up and can lean against a garage wall. When they go to the salt they don't get it in the salt water and they spray it heavily with Salt Away when they get home. Even then the HF trailer probably won't last more than a few years if exposed to salt water. In the long run a Malone would probably be the better choice.
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By TexasJim
#2301437
Malone is a better choice, but if your trailer will EVER touch salt water, or be in salt spray(beachfront), the BEST choice is a Triton all-aluminum welded trailer. $$$$$! Buy once, cry once. Even those, if they have leaf springs, will suffer from the coast. Replacing spring shackles with aluminum ones, replacing all the spring hanger bolts with stainless ones, and diligently coating the springs and axle with Corrosion-X HD every six months will hold back the dreaded rust, but not eliminate it.

Rust never sleeps! The further you can keep your trailer from salt water, the better. Washing down religiously after each trip will help. I wish someone would build and sell light-duty galvanized torsion axles in the 500-750 pound range, but they don't seem to be available. Southwest wheel has torsion half-axles, but they're not available galvanized. Anyone have any sources?

TexasJim, who lives 3/4 mile from the ICW!
User avatar
By Neumie
#2301438
The Yakima Rack n Roll trailer is awesome, albeit a pricey side. The wheels fold up and the tongue slides down so it stores very small.
By impulse
#2301443
SWFinatic wrote:I have seen a few guys go with a Harbor Freight trailer since they fold up and can lean against a garage wall. When they go to the salt they don't get it in the salt water and they spray it heavily with Salt Away when they get home. Even then the HF trailer probably won't last more than a few years if exposed to salt water. In the long run a Malone would probably be the better choice.


But is it more economical to replace a $350 trailer every 2-3 (or 5) years, or spend $1,500 on a Malone or similar? You'd have to get 10-15 years on a Malone to make it even on the $$$, and a lot can happen in that time.
By SWFinatic
#2301447
impulse wrote:
SWFinatic wrote:I have seen a few guys go with a Harbor Freight trailer since they fold up and can lean against a garage wall. When they go to the salt they don't get it in the salt water and they spray it heavily with Salt Away when they get home. Even then the HF trailer probably won't last more than a few years if exposed to salt water. In the long run a Malone would probably be the better choice.


But is it more economical to replace a $350 trailer every 2-3 (or 5) years, or spend $1,500 on a Malone or similar? You'd have to get 10-15 years on a Malone to make it even on the $$$, and a lot can happen in that time.

Yes sir I agree on the Malone being the better choice over time.
User avatar
By TrailChaser
#2301448
I have a folding aluminum trailer from northern tool.(folds up vertically and has four casters to roll around while folded) Works great and only cost $600.(if you go to the store to buy it, be sure to get them to honor the online price, and print out the paper plate for it) Took my teenage son and I a few hours to put it all together, but it was simple and came with everything included from the led lights to the air in the tires.(yes, tires came aired up) https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools ... _200660343

I bought some bigger tires on 13" rims. https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Tires- ... 3S101.html
You'd also need to buy 3/4" hex lug nuts to fit in the counterbore on the rims.(M12x1.25) https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07VPG9CP2/ ... JEb44M44FA

I made the railings out of aluminum angle "iron" and vinyl coated cable.(picked up the supplies from lowes)

I also made a 3ft tongue extension since the stock length of the trailer from tongue to tail was only 12ft.

I'm building mine to haul 4 to 6 kayaks at a time after this covid stuff blows over.(still waiting for the steel) For now it's just got a deck and railings. I've already used it twice to take the kayak down to the water. When it's all finished it'll still total under $1000 for everything. I could post some pics later if anyone wants to see what it turned out looking like.
By Tombo
#2301449
Neumie wrote:The Yakima Rack n Roll trailer is awesome, albeit a pricey side. The wheels fold up and the tongue slides down so it stores very small.


Ditto, I followed the classifieds until one popped up in Austin. Drove up the next day and bought it. Thats been about 10 years ago. There is good reason why you do not see many for sale. Expensive but its a trailer for a lifetime. I also use to to haul stuff like two by lumber and PVC pipe.
By SWFinatic
#2301451
Used trailers specifically boat trailers can save some money but can also be pretty costly. I bought a used galvanized boat trailer that was used to haul a flat bottom boat. Got the trailer for $400. After replacing the tires, hub assembly (including new bearings and seals) for both sides, new axle spindles (both sides), new tongue, coupler and trailer jack AND installing unistrut cross members and pvc tubing I'm well over a grand and still have a used trailer. Don't get me wrong it's heavy duty and will haul much more than 3 kayaks. That said if I ever have to buy another trailer I will go with something like a Triton. Yes they're expensive but you get what you pay for.
Attachments
Kayak Trailer.jpg
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By JW FunGuy
#2301453
TrailChaser wrote:I have a folding aluminum trailer from northern tool.(folds up vertically and has four casters to roll around while folded) Works great and only cost $600.(if you go to the store to buy it, be sure to get them to honor the online price, and print out the paper plate for it) Took my teenage son and I a few hours to put it all together, but it was simple and came with everything included from the led lights to the air in the tires.(yes, tires came aired up) https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools ... _200660343

I bought some bigger tires on 13" rims. https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Tires- ... 3S101.html
You'd also need to buy 3/4" hex lug nuts to fit in the counterbore on the rims.(M12x1.25) https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07VPG9CP2/ ... JEb44M44FA

I made the railings out of aluminum angle "iron" and vinyl coated cable.(picked up the supplies from lowes)

I also made a 3ft tongue extension since the stock length of the trailer from tongue to tail was only 12ft.

I'm building mine to haul 4 to 6 kayaks at a time after this covid stuff blows over.(still waiting for the steel) For now it's just got a deck and railings. I've already used it twice to take the kayak down to the water. When it's all finished it'll still total under $1000 for everything. I could post some pics later if anyone wants to see what it turned out looking like.


I like the looks of that but the tongue length was a “no”. Did you weld an extension on?
And any concern about the 45 mph speed rating?
User avatar
By JW FunGuy
#2301454
Tombo wrote:
Neumie wrote:The Yakima Rack n Roll trailer is awesome, albeit a pricey side. The wheels fold up and the tongue slides down so it stores very small.


Ditto, I followed the classifieds until one popped up in Austin. Drove up the next day and bought it. Thats been about 10 years ago. There is good reason why you do not see many for sale. Expensive but its a trailer for a lifetime. I also use to to haul stuff like two by lumber and PVC pipe.


How does this do on the highway? I don’t plan on going 80 but say 65mph?
By SWFinatic
#2301455
Answering out of turn but when I looked into these trailers Yakima told me they don't recommend a speed over 65 mph.
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By Music Man
#2301457
Ditto TrailChaser. I bought the NT aluminum trailer and added the 72 MPH speed rated tires. The Malone wire basket and plastic tub both fit on the trailer (these are pricey) so I don't use the fold up option. I attached aluminum tubing to the base and then attached the Sea Wing carriers - also a bit pricey but far short of the Mega Sport cost.

I didn't extend the tongue so I can keep it in my garage. Yes, it makes backing up a challenge. However, it is so light that I don't notice much change in the gas mileage.
Attachments
IMG_1505.JPG
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By Neumie
#2301459
SWFinatic wrote:Answering out of turn but when I looked into these trailers Yakima told me they don't recommend a speed over 65 mph.

This post isn't directed at you personally, but an FYI for the topic. Harbor Freight recommends not to exceed 45 mph with their trailer, but I'm not sure I've ever seen one traveling at less than the posted speed limit. Same goes for U-Haul trailers, they're listed for 55 mph max.
Attachments
HF trailer.jpg
Last edited by Neumie on Thu Apr 09, 2020 11:28 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
By Neumie
#2301460
JW FunGuy wrote:How does this do on the highway? I don’t plan on going 80 but say 65mph?

I pulled one regularly up to 70 mph with two kayaks. You don't really know it's there. Only limiting factor is the weight capacity is pretty low, regardless of how you have it spec'd. But it can fold up smaller than anything else on the market with the easily removable wheels.
By impulse
#2301464
Tombo wrote:I use motorcycle tires, have not looked at the speed rating but am not worried about them at 75


My concern with scooter tires is liability and insurance... Insurance companies are notorious for coming up with reasons to deny a claim. I can foresee the day that someone has a wreck with a trailer using non-DOT trailer rated wheels and the insurance company points to paragraph 6 on page 248 of their policy's fine print...

If anyone has experience with that, let me know. The idea of a large diameter, lighter wheel seems real appealing for hauling light loads like a kayak. And several companies sell kayak trailers using scooter wheels.
By Tombo
#2301471
For more than a year I towed my Rack n Roll trailer behind a Toyota Prius. Mileage dropped just a little, but I could tell the difference when towing my galvanized steel kayak trailer.
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By Music Man
#2301473
The documentation that came with my Northern Tool trailer had the same speed warning that Neumie posted. I dug around and found some fine print that mentioned the speed rated tires. Not sure what the difference is as they look the same as the stock tires.

I would suggest using these as opposed to a tire from another vehicle for insurance reasons. I try to keep it at 70 MPH or lower but have gone over with no problems. Like Neumie said, you don’t know it’s there. I have ran into the issue of it being so light that there is a lot of noise from the hitch moving in the receiver. Have ordered a devise that corrects this.

It’s funny, the tires on the Mega Sport are small and fat (not that there’s anything wrong with small and fat :D ) and have a high speed rating.
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By TrailChaser
#2301480
The speed rating for these trailers is mainly a tire issue and the manufacturer limiting their liability. Even vehicle tires have speed ratings. I'm not sure, but I assume it has to do with heat buildup(common tire killer) higher speeds equal more heat since the flex at the bulge happens faster per minute as the rpms go up. No sidewall bulge means no heat buildup, so with all that being said... The speed rating is mainly valid when you're hauling a heavy enough load to make a bulge in the sidewall.

The only other force at play would be centrifugal force. Which shouldn't matter unless you're talking about thousands of rpms. (20in tire rolling 45mph is about 560rpms..at 70mph it's about 870rpm) For a 20in diameter 870rpms is fast, but not rip things apart fast. I'm a machinist and have a good feel for rpms. lol I'd chuck up that rim/tire and comfortably turn it up to about 2000rpm(about165mph) in the lathe. :shock:
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By TrailChaser
#2301482
JW FunGuy wrote:I like the looks of that but the tongue length was a “no”. Did you weld an extension on?
And any concern about the 45 mph speed rating?


I did weld on the extension. I was planning on bracing it up, but the tongue weight is less than 100lbs in a worst case scenario and normally about 20lbs. I just cut the original thin steel off the plate and welded on 2.5x2.5" heavy wall square tubing.

Here's the trailer as it sits right now. I can't wait to get the steel to make the racks. I've already got it all planned out.
Image
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By Music Man
#2301501
The potential problem of a short tongued trailer...

So my oldest son was going on a last fishing trip before going off to college and was using my car (Sorento) to pull our old 4x8 utility trailer . He had loaded up and was heading out of the house to my final admonitions about safety. A moment later he came back in the house, white as a sheet, and could only tell me that I needed to go outside. I went out to the driveway and saw the SUV and trailer in the middle of our street, partially turned, with the bow of a kayak stuck through where the back window should have been.

I think I freaked my son out because I immediately burst into laughter, knowing full well how close I had come to doing that same thing more than once. It was a good reminder not to get in such a hurry.

Maybe I should go ahead and add that tongue extender on my new trailer :roll:
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